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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folks but i would just like to say a quick word. about th
to ship it from the gulf coast up to new york. you can actually ship it overseas to west africa or europe for probably a fraction of that. so even though the northeast is a little bit tight on gasoline, it costs so much to ship in u.s. vessels right now that some of the gasoline that might ordinarily come to the other parts of the country is going to places like nigeria, asia, europe, you name it, and that's unusual and it has to do with a shortage of american flag vessels. dagen: i'm surprised politicians aren't talking about that. but instead they are trying to deal with the tax increases and spending cuts. if they don't get a deal done on that, will we see any impact in the crude and also the gasoline markets? >> oh, absolutely. if the fiscal cliff, if we go off of it, i think we will see crude oil prices come down substantially. my thought is though if we don't do that, if we have a short-term fix, that you will see a lot of hot money come back into the market and park itself in commodities and oil is always a favorite. so if you're rooting for the fiscal cliff, you might be rooting f
right now at where things stand in europe, you'll see that the ftse is barely higher. but you do see a bit of a decline for germany and france and modest moves across all of these markets. the bank of japan easing monetary policy again today, announcing an increase of its asset buying and lending program by more than $118 billion. that move was widely expected as part of the reason that you had seen the yen under quite a bit of pressure, yesterday, at least. you'll see right now that in japan, the market there actually closed down by just over 1%, 1.2% almost. the hang seng and the shanghai composite were slightly higher. oil prices this morning, you'll see right now, are down by about 4 cents to $89.94, so you have things to pick up in those prices over the last couple of days. and the ten-year note at this point which yesterday was yielding above 1.8%, dropping down to 77.2%. finally, take a look at the dollar and gold. yen is at 83.99. gold prices this morning with all these movements in the currency markets up by about $1.10. >>> winter storm draco is moving across the united sta
: they wait until after the new year. are we still the best of the bunch question that europe is still a mess. how is china doing? >> we are actually doing the best. just look at china. the chinese economy is actually not doing that well. there are a lot of complex. the new party just took over the control. there are a lot of things to figure out. the u.s. is in the best condition right now. we have to get past this fiscal cliff and move on. connell: we probably would be talking a lot more about china and the transition of power and how president obama is supposed to do without. when you say there are economy is not doing that great, does that mean it is in jeopardy of a tough all, or it will hang in there? >> i think it will hang in there. china, i think, will grow. reasonably, i have seen some analysts come out and be pretty bullish. their economy, the outlook is willing not that bright. although, they probably will not fall hard. china is sort of setting their status quo. i think the u.s., again, back to the u.s., they have to get their act together. connell: a few days after the end of th
running this experiment in europe where they've implemented austerity in a number of countries with the idea that we're going to reduce government spending in order to reduce deficits, because we want to get the ratio of debt to g.d.p. to the size of the economy down. but what happens when they've done that is even though they may have shrunken the numerical value of the debt, the economy has contracted so much more that the debt to g.d.p. ratios get worse. it actually makes the problem worse. so, austerity is bad medicine now. >> i just read the other day that this campaign "fix the debt" raised $60 million and hired and it recruited 80 corporate ceos to go to washington and lobby for fixing the debt. what do they want? >> i think reason why the corporate executives are so big on fixing the debt is because they know that if they don't -- when they have some control over the political system through their political action committees and republican control of congress, they can't cut entitlements now. when they do eventually become a problem that will require some immediate acti
just have to look at europe where they have all these kind work rules, like you mentioned this vacation do over. she's a new european thing. >> steve: how does that work? >> i have a doctor's note, i got sick on vacation. by law, i'm allowed to compensatory vacation time for that. >> steve: let's say you're gone for two weeks and say i was sick, you get another two weeks? >> exactly. or how about severance pay. that sounds kind. you got to pay people if you fire them. in spain, the old rule was 3 1/2 years. so nobody is going to hire somebody 'cause if you don't like them, you got to pay them for more than 3 years. >> steve: it wasn't progressive. so if you had just been an employee for a certain number of years or something like that, you get an automatic 3 1/2 year severance? >> no, it doesn't take effect unless you've worked there for a year. so lots of people -- >> steve: wait a minute. you work there one year? >> that's right. now they've shortened. they'll only have to pay $200,000. no wonder spain has a 25% unemployment rate and they're rioting. >> steve: what about what the gove
it should be for adapting the paa that is in europe into asia? because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you ask a lot of questions in there. [laughter] well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was billed as a research and develop a platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. still has a benefit in research and development, but since it was built in my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and has grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because of the capabilities -- other capabilities are mature enough to be able not to have it. as far as the ability for the interceptors to be productive, i think it to look across all of technologies as we pursue in bmd, and recognize the significant technological challenges that have been associated with that program, and really i think, in the timeframe that we have had to develop these systems, i think we have done the technological part of this ballistic missile defens
and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is that our own government is making it more difficult for us to compete. >> how are they doing that? >> president obama is making the rounds. he is going to help us out by increasing our taxes. the only way we can beat governor is by investing in equipment. if the wage rates are lower in china and steel costs the same electricity costs the same the only way i can make business is to have better gimeequipment ane only way to have better equipment is to continually investment the only way to continually invest is make a profit. we are unable to invest in equipment capital accumulation increases wage growth decreases. >> there are a lot of big businesses that do okay. corporations are taxes at all. finding ways to be multi national. the
of the next 10, 15 and 20 years. some people look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new reve
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our counter-terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a regionally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the bureacracy and red tape to provide assistance. i visited countr
to you. europe has seen its own budget crisis over the past few years. are there any valuable take aways that lawmakers in the u.s. could use as guidance? >> i'm not sure. i thought very long and hard since i knew we were discussing this for parallels. and i think what you really come down to is that of compromise. and the ability to do a deal. when in the face of opposition, you just have to get something done because the ramifications are so serious if you don't. in the case of the eurozone, you had 27 countries and nobody could agree and you had different political philosoph s philosophies. that sounds similar to the fiscal cliff and certainly the eurozone pushed things to the absolute limit. almost to breaking point during the summer where again and again they would not agree until disaster was on their doorstep. that's the similarity to what we're seeing tonight. >> i know. we're hearing that negotiations are ongoing. they are continuing. there are a number of issues on both sides. ryan lizza following this. it appears as though obviously some elements of this have to be pushed for
with nutrients. and considered fine dining. and always have been in europe. >> always have been in europe. but the u.s. has been squeamish about those types of meat. >> not anymore. >> not anymore. >> but today, you have two dishes to start any meal. let's get started. the first one, is something with pomegranate. >> i want to start with chicories. they're bitter greens. most people have a beef or ham, a turkey. you want to have something that's going to be a little bitter that will cut that richness. so, we try to work with, you know, a little bit of bitter greens. this is your standard treviso. i'm going to cut that nice. really festive colors. really beautiful. >> and this is kosto franco. >> it likes -- >> i'm going to take out that core. watch out. i don't like to cut this green. i like to tear it. >> and you also have pomegranates. are these pistachios? >> these are pistachios. you have all these vibrant colors here. really simple. and now, pistachios are going to add a nut meat, fat protein to it. >> how do you get them out of the pomegranate? >> that is so hard. >> would you mind
're experiencing now. capital is on strike. much capital is not being created. we see it in western europe. we see it in japan. would apply the same poison here. real people are just debating. how much more burden would we put on already weak economy? david: steve, will republicans cave on the issue of tax rate increases. will they agree with the president and his folks to raise ttx rates? >> the rank-and-file that talk to want to hold fast on that and say, no we're not going to do it. you want to push the economy off the cliff, you're the chief executive. you're supposed to be bringing people together. and put, throw the ball back in his court. david: you think no deal? >> boehner might be willing to do a deal. the rank-and-file wants to hold fast and stick to principle which is rare in washington. david: what is your feeling? do you think we'll go off the cliff? >> i think it will go right to the end. if boehner and senator mcconnell do not cave, i think we'll kick the can down the road. for once that will be a good thing rather than a bad thing. david: steve forbes, forbes media chairman. >> go
repaired, if you will, greece, now. we don't have to worry about europe at least until the second half of the year. we have stability in china because of economic activity and that was a drag and then we have the doj promising tease and the federal reserve doing the same thing and all of a sudden it is not the world looking over the cliff, but we 3-quarters of the world looking the other way starting to come back and that is the difference. tracy: what happens? we are stealing from queue to. >> we always steal from one quarter to another. tracy: europe might come back to bother us again the second half of the year. could that mean an okay first half, second half disaster's again? >> we never have smooth sailing at anything. sell in may and go away. which works sometimes and doesn't work. what we feel good about is investors are forced with a problem that dividend taxes are going to go up. to me that is a good problem because it is going to take investors out of the safety of the blue chips and staples and utilities and put them into faster growth equities. riskier. if we look at the ri
forecast. europe offers the same lesson in reverse. thank you. as jim says, every time we talk about this, they keep taking the wrong -- lindsey graham said we're going to be greece. yeah, if we do what you want! the best way to generate jobs and growth is for the government to spend more, not less. and for taxes to stay lor owe become lower on the middle class. so you know, just -- >> roosevelt made that mistake in 1937 when the deficit hawks were saying we gotta slow this thing down. things started reverting to the depression era. levels and he quickly changed course. >> stephanie: rise finishes by saying most of the media have bought into the narrative it stems from an out-of-control budget deficit. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. he said -- let's see. interest rates he was talking about are lower than they've been in our living memory. in fact, if there was ever a time for america to borrow more to put people back to work, rebuilding our schools and crumbling infrastructure, it is now. robert reic
japanese americans had the highest casualsed in europe and the most tech crated in the history of the ute. then he turned and said i think the beneficiaries of the senator from illinois and the dream act will do the same. it was the type of short statement which captured in a few words his life, his sacrifice, what he had proven, by risking his life for this country. the reason we honor him. this morning. i close by saying two things. first, i think senator talked about his colleague of so many years and put it in a few years. he said on the floor last night, tomorrow willwill be the first day since hawaii became a state in 1959 that dane knew way will not be representing us. he really worked to shape ohio and this country. he said, you'll be missed in washington, as much as in hawaii. rays in peace, senator inouye. that summarizes how much he has meant to his and how much he has meant to america. hi last word, aloha, as senator reid said so appropriate. this kind and gentle american hero would leave with a greeting of love for everybody else. that was his life. i yield the floor. >> sena
in europe, also known as the helsinki commission, which i cochair -- which senator cardin cochairs, during senate consideration of h.r. 6156. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. wicker: thank you, mr. president. and, again, i come to the floor today to support this bill. it has is very important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississ
kingdom. i believe he owns media in eastern europe. i think this is a pretty dangerous trend. you know, the bottom line is that when you have a situation like that, it really influences not just what the american people think and feel, how they vote, but the issues that the united states congress deal with every day. let me give you an example, all right? is deficit reduction a serious issue? it is. i'm in the middle of that debate right now. but you know what is a more serious issue according to the american people? the need to create millions and millions of jobs. now how often are you turning on tv and saying, "hey, we're in the middle of a terrible recession. it is, we have 15% real unemployment or underemployment in america. we've got to create millions of jobs." that's what working people are saying, but the big money interests are saying, "oh, we've got to cut social security. we've got to cut medicare. we've got to cut medicaid." there is no other option. so i give you that just as an example of how corporate media throws out one set of ideas, where the american people are thin
entree to europe, and the hedge funds capital of america, greenwich, connecticut. it was here that bernie madoff made some of his biggest deals with large investment firms that were willing to feed him billions of dollars of their clients' money to manage. and in return, bernie madoff agreed to pay these so-called feeder funds a fortune in annual fees. the largest of the feeder funds was the fairfield greenwich group. how much money did fairfield make off bernie madoff every year? >> hundreds of millions of dollars. >> kroft: if you're a feeder fund, what are you supposed to do for those hundreds of millions of dollars? >> you're supposed to identify the world's best hedge fund managers and invest only in them, and you're supposed to make sure they're not running ponzi schemes. >> the real steroids here were the feeder funds. that's what made it an international ponzi scheme. >> kroft: attorney david boies is one of the most prominent lawyers in the country and is representing fairfield greenwich investors, who lost nearly $7 billon when madoff went under. they're suing the firm for gross
as economies. but i think for us efficiently, if you take europe they've got to take some really big decisions now, and as it were, sort out the short-term issues to do with the single currency crisis, and then make the long-term reforms that we're all going to have to make. i mean, your fiscal cliff -- some of the issues there, around entitlements and welfare and reform, they've got echoes of what we're trying to do in europe and in the uk, where frankly a lot of the systems we've built up in the post-war years, as a result of technology, as a result of an aging population, you know, as a result of rising costs in health care and elsewhere, you're going to have to make some quite big fundamental changes. so i think the issue is to sort out the short-term problem, and then get going on those long-term reforms that will allow us to start being competitive again, and taking our places from the growing economies. >> we're going to have to ask british prime minister blair to stick around for just a few moments. we want to get your take on syria. the president has a very stern warning for president
economy, more oil intensive than europe, and oil coming to the middle east before that and a dozen chinese from libya, the question i would raise is the need for china to stabilize resources of oil and energy resources and the same kind of ambition to sustain that with the geopolitical force as we have, is that going to lead to conflict we are talking about? >> yes, sir. >> what about canada? may be a quick comment on the resource issue, i take issue with whether or not it is better to know what is there or not there. canada and the united states have an interesting discussion about the border between alaska and canada. [talking over each other] >> we were a lot better off when it was not how many barrels of oil will come to each nation's economy but i would like to ask a question as to moving from the flash point of the moment, a longer term issue, the indian ocean and seeing china bases in sri lanka, does india regard this as a legitimate protection by china of its sea lanes for commerce with significant -- does it see it as an encirclement of indiana and a strategic threat to india as o
. and this was a song that was literally a global phenomenon. it came to us from korea, spread through europe, the united states, south america. i've seen videos from people all over the world doing the dance. it really created something that was at a global style. this is one of the things that is happening on youtube. we're seeing that more and more over time. >> we're talking about international. how's the fiscal cliff doing in terms of internet searches? >> not as many compelling searches about the fiscal cliff. >> happy new year. >> thank you. appreciate it. >> that's how we become famous, make a compelling fiscal cliff video. gangnam style. >> ahead on "starting point," a health scare for hillary clinton. the secretary of state is in the hospital being treated for a blood clot. the latest on her condition in a moment. >> and 16 hours and counting until the fiscal cliff free fall. can they possibly get something done? sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than
energy corridor serving central and southeastern europe and unleashing our own liquified natural gas exports to address the energy vulnerabilities of our closest allies. the potential global crisis over food production is less well understood. whereas research is opening many new frontiers in the energy sphere, the productivity of global agriculture will not keep up with projected food demand unless many countries change their policies. this starts with a much wider embrace of agriculture technology, including genetically modified techniques. the risks of climate change intensify this imperative. even as we deal with potential resource constraints, our country remains vulnerability to -- remains vulnerable to terrorism and assymetric warfare. access to the internet and social media has deeply altered international politics. in most cases for the better, but it's also contributed to instability, to sudden upheavals, like the arab spring. it's allowed destructive terrorist movements like al qaeda to franchise themselves. it's intensified risks of cyber attacks, espionage and the prolif
of immigrants. it is not europe, it is not asia. it is not africa. but it is a common action of all. the rest of us are foreigners. sometimes we forget that. >> what dc is a potential solution? >> i think those of us that get old they can demonstrate what the nonpartisanship could result in. those that serve on our committees get the message. >> with your committee and relationship with ted stevens is the politics have changed over the years and the democrats are in control, and never seems to make that much of a difference on your committee as far as the ability to produce great results. >> [inaudible] if you go in that state and say nasty things about him, he won't forget it. >> our final question is the latest the question. over and above the things you have accomplished, or have yet to accomplish, how would you like to be remembered? >> this may sound foolish, but i just want people to know that i tried my best. >> senator, thank you very much. >> this program with senator inouye took place in 2008. he died earlier today at the age of 88 after serving since 1963 in the u.s. senate. he was
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)